Resource Center

Use one of the following options to search the resource library:
Select A Topic:   

Resources on Equity and Inclusivity in Linguistics (REIL)
The LSA's Committee on Gender Equity in Linguistics (COGEL), in collaboration with SALTED (the SALT Equity & Diversity committee), have developed a guidebook for conference organizers in linguistics on how to better organize an inclusive and equitable conference. The guidebook, Resources on Equity and Inclusivity in Linguistics (REIL), is the newest collaborative project of COGEL, formerly known as the Committee on the Status of Women in Linguistics (COSWL). The guide includes tips on access & accessibility; equitable Q&A sessions; and a Code of Conduct that covers reviewers, encourages inclusive behavior, and provides mechanisms for reporting, among many other things.

We encourage anyone who's planning to organize a linguistics conference to check it out! Conferences organized in consultation and accordance with this guidebook are encouraged to include our logo on their website, and we invite organizers to contact us so we can include their conference on our website too. Inaugural REIL conferences include the upcoming AFLA 28 (McGill/National University of Singapore); FASL 30 (at MIT); SALT 31 (at Brown University); TripleA 8 (National University of Singapore); and WCCFL (at the University of Arizona).

We also encourage anyone who's interested in equity and inclusion to read the guidebook and give us feedback on how to make it better. We are subject to biases, too, and need the community's help in diversifying how we think about diversity and inclusion.

Webinar 1 of 3: Centering Linguistic Diversity and Justice in Course Design
LSA Webinar Series: Racial Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in the Linguistics Curriculum (first of three webinars)


This series of LSA webinars considers how linguistics instructors can give a more central role in their courses to scholarship from and about members of historically underrepresented groups and design them to be inclusive of diverse student backgrounds and experiences. They consider the entire linguistics curriculum, including subfields where concerns about representation and inclusion have not generally been in focus, and are being organized by representatives of a number of LSA committees, including Karen Adams, Emma Asonye, Claire Bowern, David Bowie, Lynn Burley, Catherine Davies, Kristin Denham??, Jeff Good, Mary Hudgens Henderson, Argyro Katsika, Sonja Launspach, Wesley Leonard, Anne Lobeck, Miranda McCarvel, Nathan Sanders, Lynn Santelmann, and Teresa Satterfield.

Ideas for additional webinars in this series are welcome. Please contact Jeff Good (jcgood@buffalo.edu) if you would like to suggest a specific webinar topic or if you have any questions about this series.

Expanded access to these webinars is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1924593. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this webinar are those of the presenters and authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

Webinar 2 of 3: Creating More Just and Inclusive Learning Experiences
Webinar: Creating More Just and Inclusive Learning Experiences


This was the second in a planned series of webinars on Racial Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in the Linguistics Curriculum. The webinar took place on Thursday, August 20, 2020, from 3:00 to 4:30 PM EDT. The webinar was ASL-interpreted. Please read on for a description of the webinar and panelist bios.


Mary Bucholtz (University of Caliornia, Santa Barbara) is a sociocultural linguist with a strong commitment to interdisciplinarity; in addition to her position in the UCSB Department of Linguistics, she is affiliated with the Department of Anthropology, the Department of Feminist Studies, the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, the Gevirtz Graduate School of Education, the Comparative Literature Program, and the Latin American and Iberian Studies Program.

Bucholtz' research focuses primarily on how social identities and cultural practices are brought into being through linguistic interaction. She has investigated this question in relation to race, gender, and youth identities as well as within the context of how undergraduate science and math students become socialized into scientific cultures through peer interaction.

Her current research seeks to explore the diverse forms of language and culture within California, especially in collaboration with graduate and undergraduate students as well as youth and educational partners in the Santa Barbara area.

Abdesalam Soudi (University of Pittsburgh) is a Lecturer and Internship Program Advisor in the department of Linguistics in the Dietrich School, and a Faculty Fellow with the University of Pittsburgh Honors College. He won the inaugural Diversity in the Curriculum Award in 2017 for his success in creating a diverse and inclusive learning environment; in 2018, he won the first-ever Pitt seed grant award for a proposal to build an engagement platform for connecting linguistics to the tech industry and communities. He led the publication of a special collection on Humanities in Health at Pitt, and he co-edited a volume called Diversity Across the Disciplines in 2020 and has also produced a documentary on the meaning and value of diversity (living and working together). He serves on the board of directors for the Pittsburgh Pastoral Institute. He is a member of the Dietrich School Faculty Diversity Committee. He has also served as a Mentor for refugees and immigrants with the Allegheny County Department of Human services. His research interests include sociolinguistics, electronic health records (EHRs), conversation analysis, Arabic linguistics and cultural and linguistic diversity.

Expanded access to this webinar is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1924593. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this webinar are those of the presenters and authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.



Webinar: Approaching a Queer Dialectology
Panel participants: Tyler Kibbey (University of Kentucky): "Root-Rot: Comments on a Rootedness Metric in Relation to the Queer Community" Bryce McCleary (Oklahoma State University): "Queer Folk Linguistics: Language Regard and Intersectional Identity" Jarrett Hopewell (University of Montana): "Growls and Woofs: A Theoretical and Descriptive Analysis of Conceptual Animal Metaphors in Queer Speech" Brent Watts (University of Kentucky): "The Man, The Moth, The Legend: The Role and Function of Folklore in Queer Appalachian Social Media Communities" Sponsors: UK Linguistics & the LSA Committee on LGBTQ+ [Z] Issues in Linguistics.